CUWiP 2016, Oxford, UK

 

Haida Liang

Haida Liang

Presentation title: "From Astronomy to Archaeology, Art Conservation and History"

Professor Haida Liang gained a PhD in Astronomy & Astrophysics from the Australian National University in 1996. After her PhD, she joined the X-ray Astronomy group at Service d'Astrophysique of Commissariat à l'Energie Atomique in France and then continued her work on clusters of galaxies at the Physics Department of the University of Bristol. In 2002, she changed her career path and worked at the Scientific Department of the National Gallery (London) on the development of non-invasive imaging techniques for the examination of paintings. She is currently Professor of Physics leading the Imaging & Sensing for Archaeology, Art History & Conservation (ISAAC) group at Nottingham Trent University. Her main research interests are the development and application of non-invasive imaging and spectroscopic techniques to art conservation and archaeology.

 

Christine Davies

Christine Davies

Presentation title: "The Quandary of Quarks"

Christine Davies is currently head of the particle physics theory group at the University of Glasgow and chairs the Project Board of the Science and Technology Facilities Council’s DiRAC High Performance Computing facility. She is married with two grown-up children. She studied Physics with Theoretical Physics at the University of Cambridge, graduating with a first degree in 1981 and then undertaking a PhD. In 1984 she moved, with her husband, to a postdoctoral research position at Cornell University in upstate New York.

It was at Cornell that she started work in the field of numerical solutions to the theory of the strong force, which binds the fundamental constituents of matter, quarks, into subatomic particles known as hadrons (of which the proton and neutron in the atomic nucleus are examples). These calculations are numerically very challenging and require supercomputing facilities (such as DiRAC) but are now yielding very accurate results, building on work by Christine Davies and others.

Christine Davies moved to Glasgow in 1986 and became a professor there in 1999. She was elected a Fellow of the Royal Society of Edinburgh in 2001, won the Rosalind Franklin award from the Royal Society in 2005 and was awarded an OBE in 2006. She currently holds a Wolfson Research Merit Award.

She has a strong commitment to the continued health of physics as a subject, and to the diversity of the academic community. She has given many public lectures, including a tour of Canada as Royal Society Women lecturer in 2006. She also chaired the Institute of Physics Diversity Committee 2007-2011.

 

Sonia Trigueros

Sonia Trigueros

Presentation title: "Nanotechnology for medicine: opportunities and challenges"

Sonia Trigueros’ group focuses on the design of novel nanodrug delivery system to target dividing cells, specifically cancer cells. She is also developing new Nanomedicines to tackle bacterial antibiotic resistance problem. She has a PhD in molecular biology from IBMB-CSIC and Universidad de Barcelona. After her postdoctoral research fellowships at Harvard and Oxford Universities, Trigueros was a research visitor to several academic institutions including NIH-Washington and Havana University. She is currently an Academic Fellow at the Physics Department and the Co-director of the Oxford Martin Institute of NanoMedicine at University of Oxford.

 

Helen O’Keeffe

Helen O’Keeffe

Presentation title: "Why are neutrinos so interesting?"

Helen O’Keeffe joined the department in September 2013 as a lecturer in experimental neutrino physics, following post-doctoral positions at the University of Oxford and Queen’s University, Ontario, Canada. Her research focuses on particle physics, in particular measuring properties of the neutrino. She is currently involved with the Tokai to Kamioka (T2K), Hyper-Kamiokande and SNO+ experiments.

 

Pam Thomas

Pam Thomas

Presentation title: "From physics student to Pro Vice Chancellor"

Professor Pam Thomas has been a member of staff in the Department of Physics at the University of Warwick since 1990 and a full professor since 2005. She was educated at Oxford University, where she took an BA (Hons) in Physics and a DPhil on the subject of Optical Activity in Crystals in the Physical Crystallography Group of the Clarendon Laboratory. Following a period as a Research Fellow at the Clarendon Laboratory, she moved to Warwick in 1990 to found and head the Ferroelectrics and Crystallography Group, which is part of the larger Condensed Matter Physics activity in the Department.

 

Fay Dowker

Fay Dowker

Presentation title: "A Meditation on General Relativity"

Fay Dowker is a British Professor of Theoretical Physics at Imperial College London.

As a student, she was interested in wormholes and quantum cosmology. Having studied at the University of Cambridge, Dowker was awarded the Tyson Medal in 1987 and completed her Doctor of Philosophy under the supervision of Stephen Hawking in 1990. Dowker completed postdoctoral research at Fermilab, at the University of California, Santa Barbara and also the California Institute of Technology.

She is currently a Professor of Theoretical Physics and a member of the Theoretical Physics Group at Imperial College London and an Affiliate of the Institute for Quantum Computing. She conducts research in a number of areas of theoretical physics including quantum gravity and causal set theory.

Dowker was previously a Lecturer at Queen Mary University of London.