CUWiP 2016, Oxford, UK

Academic Panel:

  • How to apply for graduate school?
  • How to pick a field of research?
  • Why pursue further education in physics?
  • What options are available outside the UK?
  • What can someone expect from a graduate programme?

Industry Panel:

  • What can you do with a physics degree?
  • Do you need a PhD to pursue certain careers?
  • What if your interests lay slightly outside physics?
  • Can you conduct new scientific research outside a university setting?
  • How can you find careers outside academia?
Panels

Academic Panellists:

Industry Panellists:

the RAL panel:


Amanda Cooper-Sarkar

Before returning to Oxford, Amanda Cooper-Sarkar did research in experimental particle physics in several of the world's major international laboratories (CERN in Switzerland, KEK in Japan, RAL in the UK). She is an internationally recognised expert in the deep structure of the proton (Parton Distribution Faunctions) and a member of the PDF4LHC advisory board for the experiments at the world's highest energy accelerator, the LHC at CERN. She is part of the ZEUS collaboration, finalising the analysis of the data from the HERA electron-proton collider at DESY Hamburg, and of the ATLAS collaboration at the Large Hadron Collider, CERN Geneva, where first data are rapidly accumulating. In 2015, Professor Cooper-Sarkar was awarded the Chadwick Medal and Prize for her study of deep inelastic scattering of leptons on nuclei which has revealed the internal structure of the proton.

Amanda Cooper-Sarkar

Jayanne English

Dr. Jayanne English has been an associate professor in the Department of Physics and Astronomy at the University of Manitoba, Canada, since 2000. She uses space-based and radio telescopes to help trace elusive Dark Matter and to investigate how galaxies form radio halos as well as develop peculiar shapes while gravitationally interacting. With respect to popularizing science, her forte' is producing striking astronomy outreach images that appear in prestigious magazines, popular and educational books, and numerous websites. English co-ordinated NASA's Hubble Heritage Project's first 2 years of image production. Her outreach work is well-served by her education at Ontario College of Art and Design University as well as her astrophysics degrees from University of Toronto (B.Sc) and Australian National University (Ph.D).

Jayanne English

Jena Meinecke

Junior Research Fellow, Christ Church, University of Oxford, Atomic and Laser Physics

Jena Meinecke’s work is out of this world—literally! Using the largest lasers on Earth, she is recreating scaled astrophysical objects, such as supernovas, that could fit in the palm of your hand. Her team wants to know: how did magnetic fields come into existence in our universe? As a graduate student, she discovered that primordial magnetic fields could be amplified by turbulence—a result that was named one of the Top 10 Breakthroughs of 2014. Now as a Junior Research Fellow, she is using the National Ignition Facility, to measure the “holy grail” of laboratory astrophysics—turbulent dynamo, the mechanism thought to be responsible for the ubiquitous magnetisation of the universe. Jena was subsequently named the Very Early Career Female Physicist of the Year by the Institute of Physics in 2015. Outside of research, she is a bit of an adrenaline junkie and enjoys extreme sports from rock climbing to skydiving.

Jena Meinecke

Merritt Moore

I’m a 4th year DPhil student in Atomic and Laser Physics in Prof. Ian Walmsley’s Ultrafast Quantum Optics group. I work on single photon sources and explore multi-photon states for quantum information experiments. I studied physics at Harvard, where I had my first experience in research (in condensed matter systems). I dance professionally in my free time, in the past with Zurich, Boston and English National Ballet.

Merritt Moore

Suchitra Sebastian

Suchitra is University Lecturer in Physics at the University of Cambridge. She holds an MS and PhD in Applied Physics from Stanford University, and an MBA from the Indian Institute of Management (Ahmedabad). Suchitra was named as one of thirty 'Exceptional Young Scientists' by the World Economic Forum in 2013 and one of the top ten 'Next big names in Physics' by the Financial Times. She received the L'Oreal-UNESCO fellowship for women in science in 2013, among other awards including the Lee-Osheroff-Richardson Prize (2007); Young Scientist Medal in Magnetism (2012); Moseley Medal (2012); Philip Leverhulme Prize (2015); and Brian Pippard Prize (2015). She is particularly interested in mentoring young women, and communicating science to a broad audience, having spoken at international public events including the Google Solve for summit, the Falling Walls International Conference, and the World Economic Forum Annual Meeting at Davos.

Suchitra Sebastian

John Wheater

I read Physics at Oxford graduating in 1979 and did my D.Phil on electroweak radiative corrections under the supervision of Chris Llewellyn Smith. I joined the academic staff in 1985 and am Professor of Physics and a Fellow of University College. I received the 1993 Maxwell Medal and Prize of the Institute of Physics, and am currently Head of the Physics Department.

John Wheater

Heather Williams

Dr Heather Williams is a senior medical physicist for Nuclear Medicine at Central Manchester University Hospitals and honorary Lecturer at the University of Manchester, and has a particular interest in positron emission tomography (PET) and remains active in imaging research. Heather is also a Director of ScienceGrrl, STEMNET ambassador, chair of the Women in Physics Group at the Institute of Physics and secretary to the UK PET Physics Group. Heather also likes standing up and talking about science, and encouraging others (particularly women) to do so. When she's not busy with all that, Heather enjoys running, hiking and introducing her sons to the wonders of the universe, often at the same time.

Heather’s attendance at CUWIP is supported by The Ogden Trust.

Heather Williams

Ellie Dobson

Ellie Dobson works for Pivotal as a Senior Data Scientist. She spent most of her early life in Northumberland planning to be a musician but did a rather unexpected U-turn at the age of 18, and after a brief foray into teaching ended up reading physics at Oxford University. She was awarded her PhD in 2009 in particle physics, and spent a few subsequent years hunting particles in the ATLAS detector as part of the LHC project.

Looking for a new challenge, she then took a job as a field engineer at MathWorks, the company behind MATLAB, specialising in statistics and parallel computing. In her spare time she likes to do anything that involves being outdoors in the sunshine.

Ellie Dobson

Anne-Marie Imafidon

A-Marie has always been interested in business, Maths and technology. Her rather unique set of achievements include passing two GCSEs aged ten (Mathematics & ICT), holding the current world record for the youngest girl ever to pass A-level computing (aged 11), a Guardian ‘Top 10 women in tech you need to know’ and being one of the youngest to be awarded a Masters’ degree in Mathematics and Computer Science by the University of Oxford, aged 20. She was also named the UK IT Industry & British Computer Society’s Young IT Professional of the Year in 2013, Red Magazine’s ‘Woman to Watch’ 2014, won a Points of Light award from the UK Prime Minister in October 2014 and was named the 29th Most Influential woman in IT in 2015. Anne-Marie has also been listed as one of Management Today’s 35 Under 35 and was on the Timewise List of 50 Power Part Timers. Anne-Marie is Head Stemette and cofounder of Stemettes – an award-winning social enterprise inspiring the next generation of females into Science, Technology, Engineering and Mathematics roles via a series of events and opportunities.

Anne-Marie Imafidon

Francisca Wheeler

Francisca Wheeler - did a degree in Physics followed by a PhD in Atomic and Molecular Physics. After 12 years of research and teaching at university I went into teaching in secondary schools. I also worked for the Institute of Physics, giving support to teachers in school, which I still continue doing on a voluntary basis.

Francisca Wheeler

Samriti Sood

Samriti Sood is a current MBA student at Brasenose College, University of Oxford. She spent 5 years in the technology industry holding pre-sales positions at Nokia Siemens Networks and Software Engineering lead positions at Cisco. At Cisco, she led Small Cell Engineering team, a team that focused on security features of 3G/4G technologies, for 4 years. She focused on improving the security implementation of Cisco products as an ethical hacker.

In parallel, she was actively involved in Cisco STEM initiative for increasing awareness among women for multiple career opportunities in STEM (Science Technology Engineering Mathematics) fields. As an MBA student at Said Business School, University of Oxford, she is leading a team of Oxford Students build digital media strategy for institutions in Cambodia. She is actively involved in Technology OBN (Oxford Business Network) and Women OBN at her business school.

Samriti Sood

Margot Stevenard

Margot Stevenard is a Researcher at Winton. She joined Winton in 2013 as an Analyst in the Research Rotation programme. After completing the programme, Margot became an Associate within the Industry Research team. Her team is primarily responsible for producing research papers and briefs for clients, and conducting industry analysis to support Winton traders and the Client Strategies team.

Margot holds a Masters degree in Physics and Astronomy from the University of Southampton. As part of her degree, Margot undertook a research project modelling black hole jets at the Harvard Smithsonian Center for Astrophysics in Cambridge, Massachusetts.

Margot Stevenard

Rachel Franklin

Last summer, I graduated from St Peter’s College, University of Oxford with an MPhys in Physics. My masters project was in Theoretical Astrophysics; modelling the chemical evolution of the Milky Way. Now I work at MetaSwitch, a network software provider, in System Test. The company builds IP communications software, both commercial and open source, and design network solutions for customers. I test this software by simulating the network that it will be used in, and how specifically the software will be used.

Rachel Franklin

Androula Alekou

Androula is doing her second post-doc in Accelerator Physics, working on the upgrade of the Diamond Light Source located at the Rutherford Appleton Laboratory (RAL). Before coming to Oxford she was a CERN Fellow for 2 years, working on the design of a future high power proton accelerator. Androula obtained her PhD at Imperial College London in a field between Particle and Accelerator Physics. She was the first undergraduate from the University of Cyprus to work at Fermilab, where she analysed data from the CDF detector. Outside work, she loves sports: she was a kung-fu instructor in Switzerland, did boxing and horse-riding and is now learning judo.

Androula Alekou

Hayley Smith

I joined STFC in 2009, on the graduate scheme as an accelerator physicist, straight from completing my degree in physics at the University of York. Being on a graduate scheme meant that I could use the topics and skills from my degree on a daily basis to be trained for a specific role whilst benefitting from the many development opportunities at the lab.

Sarah Beardsley

Sarah Beardsley is the Head of the Space Engineering and Technology Division in RAL Space. She originally trained as an astrophysicist and has worked in a variety of roles including research scientist, instrument scientist, project manager and electronics group leader. Her path demonstrates that a particular degree can lead in many different directions depending on your own interests, skills and ambitions.

Lorraine Bobb

Having grown up in the local area of West Berkshire, Lorraine had always wanted to visit and potentially work at Diamond Light Source. During her undergraduate MSci Physics degree at Royal Holloway, University of London she had the opportunity to work as a summer intern for a few months with the Diagnostics Group at Diamond Light Source. The project at this time involved prototyping a scanning knife edge instrument for beam stability measurements on beamlines. After completing her degree, Lorraine went on to do a PhD in Accelerator Physics where she was based at CERN for 3 years with experimental tests performed on the Cornell Electron Storage Ring Test Accelerator (CesrTA), Cornell University, USA. In June 2014, Lorraine joined the Diagnostics Group at Diamond Light Source.

Branwen Hide

Since completing my DPhil in Clinical Medicine - the focus of my work was structural biology - I have spent over five years working in research organizations, Higher Education Institutions and in science policy organisations, supporting research and researchers. I am currently the EU research Support officer at the STFC. I provide advice and guidance on H2020 policies to research staff, senior management and other research support staff across the organization. I proved hands-on support to ensure adequate project management and compliance with internal and external regulations. In January 2013, I temporary relocated to the USA when my husband began a Fellowship at Yale and we returned to the UK the end of Dec 2014. We have a 5 year old son. Prior to this move I was the European Funding Officer at the University of Birmingham. I have also been the Liaison and Partnership Officer at the Research Information Network (RIN), a member of the Biochemical Society Policy Committee, an Executive Committee Member of the Research Staff Association United Kingdom (UKRSA), helped in the formation of Newton’s Apple, a science policy think tank, interned in the House of Commons, and established “Females in Engineering, Science and Technology (OxFEST)” at the University of Oxford.

Grace Thompson

Grace Is Head of Talent and Skills at STFC. Her role involves attracting, retaining, engaging and developing the right people to contribute to the current and future success of STFC. After a career that spanned management consultancy, teaching and marketing Grace moved into learning and development working with companies in the High Tec and scientific sectors before joining STFC in July 2014. She leads graduate recruitment and development and aims to engage with undergraduates as early as possible in their studies to motivate and enthuse them about working for STFC.