CUWiP 2015, Oxford, UK

To provide a cohesive overview of opportunities in both academia and industry, CUWiP will host two panel sessions. The academic panel will consist of two graduate students, two post-doctoral research assistants and one lecturer from a range of backgrounds. The industry panel will take place at the Rutherford Appleton Laboratory and will include women from local science and technology-based businesses. The topics that will be covered are laid out below.

    Academic Panel:

  • How to apply for graduate school?
  • How to pick a field of research?
  • Why pursue further education in physics?
  • What options are available outside the UK?
  • What can someone expect from a graduate programme?

    Industry Panel:

  • What can you do with a physics degree?
  • Do you need a PhD to pursue certain careers?
  • What if your interests lay slightly outside physics?
  • Can you conduct new scientific research outside a university setting?
  • How can you find careers outside academia?

    Industry Panellists:

  • Hilde Schroeven-Deceuninck, Robotic Exploration Development Engineer, ESA ESCAT
  • Ceri Brenner, Central Laser Facility, STFC
  • Emily Longhi, Senior Insertion Devices (ID) Physicist, Diamond Light Source
  • Dinah Parker, Oxford Instruments
  • Susan Hezlet, Publisher, London Mathematical Society
  • Frances Holmes, Operational Analyst, AWE Aldermaston

Academic Panellists:

The members of the academic panel are described below. The panel will also include Todd Huffman (coordinator for graduate admissions) as an admissions expert and will be chaired by John Wheater, Head of Oxford Physics.

Dr. Lily Asquith

Dr. Lily Asquith

Royal Society Dorothy Hodgkin Research Fellow, University of Sussex
Particle Physics

Dr Lily Asquith is an experimental particle physicist and has been a member of the ATLAS Collaboration for nine years, since the beginning of her PhD studies at University College London. She analyses data collected by the ATLAS experiment at the Large Hadron Collider, using it to search for new particles and to study the behaviour of the recently discovered Higgs boson, so as to better understand the nature of the universe. Lily's fascination with particle physics can be experienced in her articles on the guardian blog 'Life & Physics' and in a number of public lectures, including her 2014 Ted-X talk on making music from data, which is the aim of her particle physics sonification project LHCsound.

Dr. Joanna Brunker

Dr. Joanna Brunker

Postdoctoral Research Fellow, University College London
Medical Physics and Biomedical Engineering

Joanna Brunker’s passion lies in the application of physics and engineering techniques to help improve our understanding, diagnosis and treatment of diseases. The aim of her fellowship project is to develop a new blood flow method, founded on a photoacoustic technique established during her PhD, and apply it to tumour studies. In addition she collaborates with Dr. Sarah Bohndiek, working to use photoacoustic imaging to improve our understanding of the role of oxygen in cancer progression and treatment. Joanna has additional interests in communicating science via talks and demonstrations to school children and members of the public. She is also keen on physical challenges such as running, cycling and hiking, and enjoys practical creativity, including helping at a children’s pottery club.

Francesca Day

Francesca Day

DPhil graduate student, University of Oxford
Theoretical Physics

Francesca Day is studying for a DPhil in theoretical physics. Her research focuses on particle astrophysics, looking for hints of the "dark universe" - dark matter, dark energy and dark radiation. Fran is particularly interested in modelling how particles travel through the complex environments in galaxies. Francesca is an enthusiastic science communicator and regularly performs at science comedy nights. She is also working with a small charity, TASTE, to bring practical science lessons to students in rural Uganda. Fran is particularly keen to encourage more girls and young women to pursue careers in the physical sciences and has written on women in science for the Huffington Post.

Jena Meinecke

Jena Meinecke

DPhil graduate student, University of Oxford
Atomic and Laser Physics

Jena Meinecke is leading an experimental effort to answer one of the biggest questions facing contemporary astronomers: how did magnetic fields come into existence in our universe? Using the largest lasers on Earth, she creates supernovae that could fit in the palm of your hand and are used to study magnetogenesis. As a graduate student, she discovered that primordial magnetic fields could be amplified by turbulence—a result that was named one of the Top 10 Breakthroughs of 2014. As she begins to transition into a postdoc position, she is focusing her efforts on measuring turbulent dynamo using the largest laser on Earth—the National Iginition Facility. Outside of research, Jena is a bit of an adrenaline junkie and enjoys extreme sports from rock climbing to skydiving.

Alba Pellaroque

Alba Pellaroque

DPhil graduate student, University of Oxford
Condensed Matter Physics

Alba Pellaroque is focused on developing new low cost photovoltaic technologies called organic-inorganic perovskite solar cells. Perovskites have received significant attention from the scientific community, and are now regarded as the most promising solar cell material. Alba conducted her undergraduate studies in Materials Engineering at the National Institute of Applied Sciences in France. Afterwards, she studied in Mexico for her first year Masters, followed by a final internship as an engineer in Australia working for Dyesol, a company developing dye-sensitized solar cells. Outside of research, she enjoys rowing. She started rowing for St Anne’s College last year, and is now rowing for the Oxford University Women Lightweight Rowing Club hoping to defeat Cambridge at the Henley Boat Race!