CUWiP 2015, Oxford, UK
Daniela Bortoletto
Daniela Bortoletto
Daniela Bortoletto is a professor of experimental particle physics who uses powerful accelerators for exploring the energy frontier and investigating the most fundamental constituents of the Universe. She is a co-discoverer of the Higgs boson and the top quark. She is currently studying the properties of the Higgs boson and searching for new physics at the LHC. In addition she plays an important role in the development of instrumentation for particle detection. Daniela was the E. M. Purcell distinguished Professor of Physics at Purdue University before joining the University of Oxford in 2013. She has received numerous awards including an U.S. National Science Foundation (NSF) Early Career Award and an Alfred P. Sloan Fellowship.  She is a Fellow of the American Physical Society and the American Association for the Advancement of Science. She is the author of over 700 physics papers.  Daniela is a sought-after lecturer and advisor about particle physics. She has been a member of the U.S. Particle Physics Projects Prioritization Panel (P5), the High Energy Physics Advisory Panel (HEPAP) to the U.S. Department Of Energy (DOE) and NSF, and the Mathematical and Physical Science Advisory Committee (MPSAC) to the NSF.  She is currently the Chair of the Fermilab Program Advisory Committee. Daniela is passionate about gender issues in physics and increasing female participation in physics and other sciences.
Jena Meinecke
Jena Meinecke
Jena Meinecke is a 4th year DPhil student in Atomic and Laser Physics at the University of Oxford, specialising in experimental laboratory astrophysics. Using the largest lasers on Earth, she creates one of the most powerful events in the known universe, supernovae, which could fit in the palm of a hand. By creating “table-top” supernovae, she can better understand how magnetic fields came into existence in the universe. Jena’s work has had far-reaching implications in astrophysics, resulting in high impact publications, an invited talk at the European Physical Society, a cover feature on the BBC’s Sky at Night Magazine, and television appearances on the Discovery Channel to be aired next year. She was named the American Physics Society’s Woman Physicist of the Month (October) and shortlisted for the Institute Of Physics’s Very Early Career Award and Women of the Future Award. Jena is notably the Founder and President of the Oxford Women in Physics Society, which hosts a variety of events and provides a mentoring programme to promote women in the department. Prior to Oxford, she studied physics and mathematics at the University of California, Los Angeles (UCLA) and worked at the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) for four years, conducting experiments on inertial confinement fusion. She is incredibly grateful to have a wonderful supervisor and research group who inspire and support her work at every stage. Outside of physics, Jena is an artist at heart—previously wanting to pursue a career in art before becoming passionate about science. To maintain a healthy work-life balance, she enjoys rock climbing, caving, and skydiving.


Androula Alekou
Androula Alekou
Hi everyone! My name is Andri (or Androula) and I have now started a post-doc in Accelerator Physics with the University of Oxford and the John Adams Institute. I'm working on the upgrade of the Diamond Light Source, which is located at the Rutherford Appleton Laboratory (RAL). Before coming to Oxford I was a CERN Fellow in Geneva, Switzerland for 2 years, working on the design of a future accelerator. I obtained my PhD at Imperial College London in a field between Particle and Accelerator physics. As a final year undergraduate at the University of Cyprus I chose to focus on Particle Physics and went to Fermilab, where I analysed data from the CDF detector. Outside work, I like being involved in many activities; for example in Switzerland, I was a kung-fu instructor, enjoyed boxing, horse riding, playing football and skiing. Aside from sports I relax by painting and playing the guitar. I hope you will really enjoy the conference!
Tessa Baker
Tessa Baker
I’m a postdoc in astrophysics and a Junior Research Fellow at All Souls College. I’m a member of the theoretical cosmology group; my research focusses on testing alternative theories of gravity that have been proposed to explain the accelerating expansion rate of the Universe. I studied at Oxford for both my undergraduate and postgraduate degrees too — I loved it here so much that I couldn’t bear to leave! Outside of work you’ll find me rambling up hills, mooching around Oxford’s numerous coffee shops, or caterwauling in a choir.

Ricarda Beckmann

Ricarda Beckmann
I’m a Dphil student and I want to understand how supermassive black holes in the centre of most galaxies grew so big, in such a "short" amount of time (What’s a few gigayears anyway?). To do so I write cosmological simulations which simulate a chunk of the universe with thousands of galaxies in it. On a daily basis, I write plenty of code and spend even more time debugging, before sending it off to the supercomputers. When not neck deep in error codes, I like to go for long walks, take pictures and do outreach. I particularly love giving talks in our little planetarium, or talking about my research.

Kathryn Boast

Kathryn Boast
Kathryn is a DPhil student working on Lux-Zeplin (LZ), a direct dark matter detection experiment. Currently in her second year, she was also in Oxford for her undergraduate studies reading Physics and Philosophy. Finding terrestrial signs of dark matter would revolutionise our picture of the universe and confirm answers to some of the most important questions in physics today, so LZ is a thrilling experiment to be part of. When she isn't in the lab, Kathryn loves explaining physics to anyone who will listen - she talks at outreach days and science festivals on behalf of the department and enjoys working with the university science magazine, Bang!, as well as writing a physics blog when she gets the chance.

Mireia Crispin Ortuzar
Mireia Crispin Ortuzar
Hi there! I am Mireia, a 3rd year DPhil student in particle physics who enjoys amateur design. When I'm not busy analysing data from the ATLAS detector in the search for new supersymmetric particles, I spend my time fiddling with colours, margins, font types and sketches. In the past couple of years I have designed, among other things, the Balliol College Musical Society logo and website, the Balliol College 750th Anniversary logo, the Formal Hall posters for Robinson College, Cambridge and the Research Day logo, posters and booklets again for Robinson College, Cambridge.
Holly Elbert
Holly Elbert
I'm a 3rd year DPhil student in astrophysics working with Profs. Andrew Bunker and Matt Jarvis and Dr Aprajita Verma. My research involves using infrared data to study galaxy evolution and formation at very high redshifts. In particular, I study populations of young, star-forming galaxies in the hopes of measuring their ultraviolet fluxes, finding their star formation rates and working out how they have built up their stellar mass. I am also very involved with outreach and have co-run a series of telescope evenings for school children, as well as helping out with large public outreach events.
Megan Engel
Megan Engel
Megan earned her BSc in astrophysics and her MSc in condensed matter/biophysics from the University of Alberta, and is currently reading for a DPhil in theoretical physics with Profs. Ard Louis and Jonathan Doye at Oxford. She is interested in the intersection of physics, biology, and chemistry, particularly the folding processes of biological molecules such as proteins and nucleic acids. Her work uses statistical mechanics to try to understand biological self-assembly. Her thesis will involve computational simulations, theoretical work, and some experiments performed using laser optical tweezers to pry single molecules apart.
Natalie Fuller
Natalie Fuller
Hello! I am a third year undergraduate at Somerville College. I am passionate about encouraging women in physics to remain in academia and about College and University access. Outside of Physics I enjoy baking and dancing!
Sue Geddes
Sue Geddes
Ilaria Gianani
Ilaria Gianani
Hi everyone! I am a DPhil student in Atomic and Laser Physics under the supervision of Prof. Ian Walmsley. I am working on a project on ultrafast metrology, and I am currently in my third year. Before coming to Oxford I did my B.S. and Master in Rome La Sapienza University, where I worked under the supervision of Professor Paolo Mataloni. Outside the lab you can find me organising musical theatre performances and workshops around Oxford, singing, playing the piano, or playing tennis.
Lesley Gray
Lesley Gray
Danielle Kaminski
Danielle Kaminski
I am currently a 3rd year DPhil student in condensed matter physics, working with Dr Arzhang Ardavan. My work focuses mainly on the use of electron paramagnetic resonance to investigate and manipulate novel molecular materials. Prior to this, I gained my MSci degree at the University of Cambridge, undertaking research projects in astronomy, with Dr Łukasz Wyryzykowski, computational biophysics, with Dr Ulrich Keyser and experimental biophysics, with Dr Jochen Guck.
Nana Liu
Nana Liu
Hello all! I am a third year DPhil student in Atomic and Laser physics, currently in Prof. Vlatko Vedral's theory group, studying quantum thermodynamics and its application to the expanding universe. I belong to a wonderful, supportive group where there are always vibrant and stimulating discussions both inside and outside of physics. Before coming to Oxford, I completed my masters in physics at the University of Melbourne, where I also did my bachelor degree in mathematics. Outside of physics, I like playing the piano, singing, and riding my bike. So happy to be part of the team!
Merritt Moore
Merritt Moore
Diana di Paolo
Diana di Paolo
CCiao! I am a 3rd year DPhil student in biophysics at the Life Sciences Interface Doctoral Training Centre and St. Cross College, Oxford. My research focuses on dynamics and protein exchange in the bacterial flagellar motor of Escherichia coli combining single-molecule fluorescence techniques, electroporation of fluorescent dye-labelled proteins and super-resolution microscopy. Out of the lab, my interests include dancing, attending the events of the societies that I am member of, and travelling
Aprajita Verma
Aprajita Verma
I'm a research fellow and Deputy Project Scientist for the UK E-ELT programme working in the sub-department of Astrophysics. I got my BSc and PhD at Imperial College London, followed by a short post-doc, and then moved to the Max Planck Institute for Extraterrestrial Physics in Garching, Germany. My research is based on understanding the formation and evolution of galaxies. In particular, my work focusses on determining the properties of star-forming and black hole hosting galaxies and the role of dust and metallicity in their evolution. I am very interested in outreach and am co-PI of the Citizen Science Project Space Warps (spacewarps.org), a search for gravitational lenses.
Sarah White
Sarah White
Hiya! I'm a final year DPhil student in Astrophysics, working with Prof. Matt Jarvis. My research involves using multi-wavelength data to study radio-quiet quasars, with an eye to disentangle the radio emission due to black-hole accretion from that due to star formation. This has important consequences for models of galaxy evolution, as it is still not well-understood how these physical phenomena interact. Outside of the office I have many interests that keep me busy, but you'll most likely find me exploring a museum during the winter and playing cricket during the summer. For CUWiP UK I will be organising the trip to the Rutherford Appleton Laboratory, and look forward to meeting you all.

Grzegorz Agacinski
Grzegorz Agacinski
I am a Web Developer, part of the Web team in IT Support at the Department of Physics, University of Oxford. Main responsibilities: users and web applications/infrastructure support.